The Difference Between White Balsamic And Dark Balsamic Vinegar

RSS
The Difference Between White Balsamic And Dark Balsamic Vinegar

Balsamic Vinegar, that syrupy, dark brown, slightly sweet yet tangy, ingredient is a staple in out panty, and for outstanding reasons. Use it in a easy to make weeknight salad, drizzle it over wedge of Parmesan for a guest-worthy treat, or even use it in baking, the possibilities are endless. Whatever way you end up using it, have you heard of White Balsamic Vinegar?

Balsamic Vinegar

‘True’ Balsamic Vinegar has a protected designation of origin seal on its label. This way you’re almost guaranteed that the vinegar is developed in the traditional way: Trebbiano or Lambrusco grape juice from, Italian regions of Modena and Reggio Emilia, is reduced and then aged in barrels for anywhere between 12 to 25 years.

And even though a single bottle of the real Balsamic Vinegar can cost upwards of a few hundred dollars, the more commonly discovered (and more affordable) variety is Balsamic Vinegar of Modena.

This Balsamic Vinegar is also produced in the Italian region of Modena, but is generally made using a mix combination of wine vinegar and grape juice and may be aged for less time. Nonetheless, both versions add a darkness, complexity and sweet acidity to a wide range of dishes, so it’s up to your wallet which one you choose.

We Our Balsamic Vinegar Experts Enjoy It In: Salads and sauces

Our Balsamic Vinegars Specialist suggest that you try it in:

  • Panzanella Salad
  • Pomegranate Pulled Pork
  • Crispy Szechuan Duck

White Balsamic Vinegar

Comparable to its classic counterpart, White Balsamic Vineger is a milder and slightly less-sweet version. It’s mainly made in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna by cooking white Trebbiano grapes, but at a higher pressure and lower temperature, to retain its pale and golden hue. From there it may be aged, but for no longer than one year in order to retain its lightness.

Our White Balsamic Vinegar Specialist suggest that you try and use it when you’re looking for softer flavours, or aesthetically when you want to keep your sauces and dressings light in colour.

Our White Balsamic Vinegar Specialist suggest that you use it in: Summery meals.

Try it in:

  • Chicken and Pepper Bake
  • Strawberry Tea Sandwiches

Previous Post Next Post

  • Alexis Barros